Your Complex Brain

Reduce Your Chances of Alzheimer’s. Here’s How.

April 02, 2024 Krembil Brain Institute Season 3 Episode 2
Reduce Your Chances of Alzheimer’s. Here’s How.
Your Complex Brain
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Your Complex Brain
Reduce Your Chances of Alzheimer’s. Here’s How.
Apr 02, 2024 Season 3 Episode 2
Krembil Brain Institute

In the time that it takes to say this sentence – three seconds – someone in the world will develop dementia, a group of symptoms impacting memory, thinking, mood, behaviour and the ability to complete everyday tasks. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia.

With people living longer, even into their 90s and beyond, dementia is becoming the biggest and most consequential global health threat of our time. But, according to a landmark study in The Lancet medical journal, there are 12 modifiable risk factors that can reduce your chances of getting dementia at any age – by up to 40%.

In this episode of Your Complex Brain, we discuss which of those risk factors are most impactful to lower – or even reverse – your risk of dementia, with a focus on the latest science looking at the benefits of exercise.

Featuring:
Maria Martinez has been a social worker nearly 25 years. Most recently, she has worked with the team at UHN’s Memory Clinic, helping patients living with Alzheimer’s and dementia, and their families, navigate their diagnosis and community supports.

Dr. Carmela Tartaglia
is a Neurologist and a Clinician Scientist with UHN’s Krembil Brain Institute, as well as co-Director of UHN’s Memory Clinic and an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Laura Middleton is an associate professor and the Schlegel Research Chair in Dementia and Active Living, at the University of Waterloo. She is also an Affiliate Scientist at KITE, the research arm of UHN’s Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. 

Additional resources:
Dr. Carmela Tartaglia’s interview on EP 1 of Your Complex Brain – ‘The Quest to Solve the Concussion Problem’
Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s and Dementia (video)
UHN Memory Clinic
Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA)
Dr. Laura Middleton’s research project - DREAM (Dementia Resources for Eating, Activity, and Meaningful Inclusion
Dr. Laura Middleton’s research project - DICE (Dementia Inclusive Choices for Exercise)

The Your Complex Brain production team is Heather Sherman, Jessica Schmidt, Dr. Amy Ma, Kim Perry, Sara Yuan, Meagan Anderi, Liz Chapman, and Lorna Gilfedder.

The Krembil Brain Institute, part of University Health Network, in Toronto, is home to one of the world's largest and most comprehensive teams of physicians and scientists uniquely working hand-in-hand to prevent and confront problems of the brain and spine, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, stroke, spinal cord injury, chronic pain, brain cancer or concussion, in their lifetime. Through state-of-the-art patient care and advanced research, we are working relentlessly toward finding new treatments and cures.

Do you want to know more about the Krembil Brain Institute at UHN? Visit us at: uhn.ca/krembil

To get in touch, email us at krembil@uhn.ca or message us on social media:
Instagram - @krembilresearch
Twitter - @KBI_UHN
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/KrembilBrainInstitute

Thanks for listening!

Show Notes

In the time that it takes to say this sentence – three seconds – someone in the world will develop dementia, a group of symptoms impacting memory, thinking, mood, behaviour and the ability to complete everyday tasks. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia.

With people living longer, even into their 90s and beyond, dementia is becoming the biggest and most consequential global health threat of our time. But, according to a landmark study in The Lancet medical journal, there are 12 modifiable risk factors that can reduce your chances of getting dementia at any age – by up to 40%.

In this episode of Your Complex Brain, we discuss which of those risk factors are most impactful to lower – or even reverse – your risk of dementia, with a focus on the latest science looking at the benefits of exercise.

Featuring:
Maria Martinez has been a social worker nearly 25 years. Most recently, she has worked with the team at UHN’s Memory Clinic, helping patients living with Alzheimer’s and dementia, and their families, navigate their diagnosis and community supports.

Dr. Carmela Tartaglia
is a Neurologist and a Clinician Scientist with UHN’s Krembil Brain Institute, as well as co-Director of UHN’s Memory Clinic and an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Laura Middleton is an associate professor and the Schlegel Research Chair in Dementia and Active Living, at the University of Waterloo. She is also an Affiliate Scientist at KITE, the research arm of UHN’s Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. 

Additional resources:
Dr. Carmela Tartaglia’s interview on EP 1 of Your Complex Brain – ‘The Quest to Solve the Concussion Problem’
Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s and Dementia (video)
UHN Memory Clinic
Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA)
Dr. Laura Middleton’s research project - DREAM (Dementia Resources for Eating, Activity, and Meaningful Inclusion
Dr. Laura Middleton’s research project - DICE (Dementia Inclusive Choices for Exercise)

The Your Complex Brain production team is Heather Sherman, Jessica Schmidt, Dr. Amy Ma, Kim Perry, Sara Yuan, Meagan Anderi, Liz Chapman, and Lorna Gilfedder.

The Krembil Brain Institute, part of University Health Network, in Toronto, is home to one of the world's largest and most comprehensive teams of physicians and scientists uniquely working hand-in-hand to prevent and confront problems of the brain and spine, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, stroke, spinal cord injury, chronic pain, brain cancer or concussion, in their lifetime. Through state-of-the-art patient care and advanced research, we are working relentlessly toward finding new treatments and cures.

Do you want to know more about the Krembil Brain Institute at UHN? Visit us at: uhn.ca/krembil

To get in touch, email us at krembil@uhn.ca or message us on social media:
Instagram - @krembilresearch
Twitter - @KBI_UHN
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/KrembilBrainInstitute

Thanks for listening!